Luxury timepieces, long thought of as a piece of jewelry, have transcended their humble roots as timekeeping devices and moved right into the territory of genuine investments. While some watch collectors think of their watches as precious family heirlooms – a portion of watch collectors prefer to think of their watches as more than just a piece of jewelry, but instead, as assets.  

The best analog for this type of collector is the automotive collector. While many car enthusiasts are happy to drive their prized sports car, some collectors have a different objective. Investement-minded car collectors keep their cars in pristine condition, never drive them, yet keep the cars in perfect working order.

As seasoned collectors ourselves, we work hard to ensure that our inventory is filled with pieces for both the investor as well as the casual collector.

Best brands for investment

Generally, if the brand is popular and well respected amongst watch collectors, it’s going to hold its value better than others. At this point, Rolex, AP, A. Lange & Söhne and Patek Philippe are holding their value remarkably well.

Some, such as Rolex Stainless Steel Professionals like the Daytona and GMT Master II as well as the Patek Philippe stainless steel watches. These watches are even exceeding their original MSRP. In the car world, think of them as the Ford GTs or Porsche 918s. Sure, the MSRP is a certain price, but good luck finding one.

These watches are so highly coveted, and so difficult to obtain that the market has dictated that stainless steel versions’ prices exceed the MSRPs of their precious metal counterparts. How crazy is that?

Best Case Materials for investment collection

Surprisingly, while rose gold has come into favor stylistically, it’s stainless steel that’s come into vogue for speculators of the hottest watches on the market. Why? It’s because they’re the easiest to flip on the marketplace. The average buyer just entering the market doesn’t want to pay three times the cost for one of the warmer metals when stainless steel is thought to be a more versatile metal on the secondary market.

As for our car metaphor, think of it as ordering a Ferrari in Red as opposed to Green over Tan. Sure, that green/tan combo is classic for Jaguars and other sports cars, but it sure as heck is harder to sell on the back end for potential buyers.

Why?

Well, only a seasoned buyer is going to recognize British Racing Green/Tan as a classic combo and want to take it home. Meanwhile, nearly every potential Ferrari buyer is going to want a red Ferrari thanks to decades of movies, TV shows and race cars starring red Ferraris. It’s just a better buy to get something that’s in the middle of the road if you’re thinking of selling the piece down the line.

Using the same thought, it’s also better not to engrave watches because it could hurt the value of your timepiece as well.

Best Complications for collection

This is where it gets interesting. For Rolex, a GMT on the Master II holds its value like no other while the GMT on the Explorer II is crashing (Weird, right?). Meanwhile, old faithful chronograph Daytona is holding strong, but for a few months, the stainless Pepsi GMT Master II held the collectability crown.

On the flip side, for Patek Nautiluses, the 5712/1A Moonphase Power Reserve is about as complicated as they come with a moon phase, power reserve and small seconds, yet it continues to be one of Patek’s most sought-after models.

There’s also occasional curveballs like the Omega 45th Anniversary Silver Snoopy 311.32.42.30.04.003 that’s selling on the secondary market for roughly four times its original cost.

Why? Well, it turns out that the market does not care about complications.

How can this be? Well – that’s easy.

Supply and Demand

Instead, it has everything to do with supply and demand.

If you can’t find it in an Authorized Dealer, it’s going to skyrocket it value. The same principle works for cars, clothes, children’s toys (think of parents trampling each other for the hottest new toy each Christmas), and here, high end timepieces. If demand is high, and supply is low, the price is going to skyrocket - Economics 101 – or would that be 001?

Here at Burdeen’s Jewelry we specialize in tracking down the hardest to obtain fine timepieces from Rolex to Patek to Audemars Piguet, and of course, our own roster of nine high end brands. Call us and we’ll find that piece that no one else can.

Luxury timepieces, long thought of as a piece of jewelry, have transcended their humble roots as timekeeping devices and moved right into the territory of genuine investments. While some watch collectors think of their watches as precious family heirlooms – a portion of watch collectors prefer to think of their watches as more than just a piece of jewelry, but instead, as assets.  

The best analog for this type of collector is the automotive collector. While many car enthusiasts are happy to drive their prized sports car, some collectors have a different objective. Investement-minded car collectors keep their cars in pristine condition, never drive them, yet keep the cars in perfect working order.

As seasoned collectors ourselves, we work hard to ensure that our inventory is filled with pieces for both the investor as well as the casual collector.

Best brands for investment

Generally, if the brand is popular and well respected amongst watch collectors, it’s going to hold its value better than others. At this point, Rolex, AP, A. Lange & Söhne and Patek Philippe are holding their value remarkably well.

Some, such as Rolex Stainless Steel Professionals like the Daytona and GMT Master II as well as the Patek Philippe stainless steel watches. These watches are even exceeding their original MSRP. In the car world, think of them as the Ford GTs or Porsche 918s. Sure, the MSRP is a certain price, but good luck finding one.

These watches are so highly coveted, and so difficult to obtain that the market has dictated that stainless steel versions’ prices exceed the MSRPs of their precious metal counterparts. How crazy is that?

Best Case Materials for investment collection

Surprisingly, while rose gold has come into favor stylistically, it’s stainless steel that’s come into vogue for speculators of the hottest watches on the market. Why? It’s because they’re the easiest to flip on the marketplace. The average buyer just entering the market doesn’t want to pay three times the cost for one of the warmer metals when stainless steel is thought to be a more versatile metal on the secondary market.

As for our car metaphor, think of it as ordering a Ferrari in Red as opposed to Green over Tan. Sure, that green/tan combo is classic for Jaguars and other sports cars, but it sure as heck is harder to sell on the back end for potential buyers.

Why?

Well, only a seasoned buyer is going to recognize British Racing Green/Tan as a classic combo and want to take it home. Meanwhile, nearly every potential Ferrari buyer is going to want a red Ferrari thanks to decades of movies, TV shows and race cars starring red Ferraris. It’s just a better buy to get something that’s in the middle of the road if you’re thinking of selling the piece down the line.

Using the same thought, it’s also better not to engrave watches because it could hurt the value of your timepiece as well.

Best Complications for collection

This is where it gets interesting. For Rolex, a GMT on the Master II holds its value like no other while the GMT on the Explorer II is crashing (Weird, right?). Meanwhile, old faithful chronograph Daytona is holding strong, but for a few months, the stainless Pepsi GMT Master II held the collectability crown.

On the flip side, for Patek Nautiluses, the 5712/1A Moonphase Power Reserve is about as complicated as they come with a moon phase, power reserve and small seconds, yet it continues to be one of Patek’s most sought-after models.

There’s also occasional curveballs like the Omega 45th Anniversary Silver Snoopy 311.32.42.30.04.003 that’s selling on the secondary market for roughly four times its original cost.

Why? Well, it turns out that the market does not care about complications.

How can this be? Well – that’s easy.

Supply and Demand

Instead, it has everything to do with supply and demand.

If you can’t find it in an Authorized Dealer, it’s going to skyrocket it value. The same principle works for cars, clothes, children’s toys (think of parents trampling each other for the hottest new toy each Christmas), and here, high end timepieces. If demand is high, and supply is low, the price is going to skyrocket - Economics 101 – or would that be 001?

Here at Burdeen’s Jewelry we specialize in tracking down the hardest to obtain fine timepieces from Rolex to Patek to Audemars Piguet, and of course, our own roster of nine high end brands. Call us and we’ll find that piece that no one else can.